×

Suicidal Thoughts

If your child is experiencing suicidal thoughts, they should see a doctor as soon as possible. Although many young people who experience such thoughts may not want to act on them, they are a sign that they are feeling overwhelmed and need help urgently. For some people suicidal thoughts may take the form of imagining that everything would be easier if they weren't here, but they haven't thought about how they would kill themselves or made plans. If a young person has made detailed plans, that is an even more serious concern. You (or your child if they are an adult) can speak urgently to your GP who can make an emergency referral to the mental health services. There is more advice either via the helpline section or below.

How can I help my child ?
https://papyrus-uk.org/worried-about-someone/

How can I talk to my child about suicidal thoughts?
https://www.cwmt.org.uk/parents-guide 

My child has been having thoughts of suicide
https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/keeping-children-safe/mental-health-suicidal-thoughts-children/


Childline: for young people who might be feeling suicidal. For all ages up to 19 years.
Advice, ways of coping, the chance to talk to a counsellor online and to get support from other young people on the message boards.
https://www.childline.org.uk/info-advice/your-feelings/mental-health/suicide/


Papyrus (Prevention of Young Suicide) www.papyrus-uk.org
Dedicated to trying to prevent young suicide.
Confidential advice and support for young people who feel suicidal on HOPEline UK 0800 068 41 41
Text: 07786 209 697  Email: pat@papyrus-uk.org 


Some help on suicidal thoughts for young people
https://youngminds.org.uk/find-help/feelings-and-symptoms/suicidal-feelings/


The Samaritans Helpline Free calls from any phone on 116 123.


CALM (Campaign Against Living Miserably) dedicated to preventing male suicide
Helpline: 0800 58 58 58 (Daily 17:00-midnight) and webchat available.


Students against depression
This website has several excellent sections such as “I am having strange thoughts” and “I am struggling to go on”. Practical advice on prevention and treatment, self-care, safety planning and more.
https://www.studentsagainstdepression.org/


Hope boxes

A hope box is a real (or sometimes virtual) box that you put together, containing things that help you feel calm, distract you, give you joy or remind you of things or people you love. It can be a really helpful thing to have when you're distressed or having thoughts of harming yourself.  The App below has a similar option where you can upload photos, poems, words or music that might help you. This link on Papyrus UK explains more and gives some examples: Hope Box
 


Apps

Stay Alive – a Suicide Prevention App where you can keep a safety plan, read about strategies for staying safe, explore the tips on how to stay grounded when you are feeling overwhelmed, try the guided-breathing exercises and store photos and memories that are important to you. It links directly to national crisis numbers and you can also store your own numbers of people to contact when you’re in a crisis.
https://www.prevent-suicide.org.uk/stay_alive_suicide_prevention_mobile_phone_application.html

Calm Harm- an App designed mainly for people to help reduce the urge to self -harm but generally useful for emotional regulation as it suggests soothing, distracting, breathing  or other activities that you can choose from. Appealing graphics and lots and lots of ideas.
https://calmharm.co.uk

HappyMaps use cookies for.....